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Michael Barratt Brown, Pauline Tiffen, Susan George

The Political Economy of Imperialism: Critical Appraisals

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Michael Barratt Brown; Pauline Tiffen

Michael Barratt Brown (15 March 1918 - 7 May 2015) was a British economist, political activist and adult educator. He was a key figure in the creation of the British in the period after the ; he helped to found the movement in Britain; and he was the first Principal of , a residential centre for adult learners in South Yorkshire.

Barratt Brown was born in 1918. His father, Alfred Barratt Brown, was a Quaker who was imprisoned for his opposition to the First World War. Alfred became Principal of , Oxford, where visitors included the philosopher , the Indian nationalist leader and , the Anglican primate. After attending a Quaker boarding school in York, Michael Barratt Brown studied Classics at Oxford. In 1940 he joined the , then switched to the . He later stated that his wartime experiences, particularly in Yugoslavia, led him to distance himself from his Quaker faith and join the .

In Memoriam: Michael Barratt Brown

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    Models in Political Economy: A…

    by Michael Barratt Brown
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  • Solidarity from Below - Michael Barratt Brown

    Around 80 people gathered yesterday at Golders Green to say goodbye to Michael Barratt Brown. Michael was an extraordinary man: born in 1918, he made his mark as an economist, political activist, gardener, peace campaigner, free trade pioneer, Quaker and above all as an adult educator. Oh – and as a runner.

    Barratt Brown was born in 1918. His father, Alfred Barratt Brown, was a Quaker who was imprisoned for his opposition to the First World War. Alfred became Principal of , Oxford, where visitors included the philosopher , the Indian nationalist leader and , the Anglican primate. After attending a Quaker boarding school in York, Michael Barratt Brown studied Classics at Oxford. In 1940 he joined the , then switched to the . He later stated that his wartime experiences, particularly in Yugoslavia, led him to distance himself from his Quaker faith and join the .