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The usefulness of qualitative research in healthcare

Qualitative Research in Nursing and Healthcare

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Using qualitative methods in health related action research

Professor Immy Holloway has been at BournemouthUniversity since its inception and works in the School of Healthand Social Care. Though now retired from full-time work, she stilltakes an active in teaching and PhD supervision. She wrote, editedand co-wrote several books in the field of qualitative researchwhich have been translated into several languages and publishedarticles in peer reviewed journals. Her latest book is A-Z ofQualitative Research in Healthcare. (2008) Oxford:Blackwell.

Qualitative research in healthcare refers broadly to methods used to collect and analyze textual or image-based data in order to make sense of behavioral and practice issues in the clinical setting. We can also use qualitative research to make sense of program evaluation responses.

There are some important differences between qualitative and quantitative research. Instead of using statistical techniques to analyze numerical data, qualitative analysis uses structured, interpretive steps to analyze text or images. In addition, qualitative research doesn’t usually test a hypothesis or lead to generalizations, but instead focuses on the complexity of meanings that participants bring to their experience of clinical practice and to the context in which practice occurs. You can also use qualitative methods to generate a hypothesis that could subsequently be tested by a quantitative method, such as a survey.

FAQ 2: I have mountains of responses to open-ended questions from program evaluations that I think are full of valuable insight, but I don’t know what to do with all this text.

Qualitative Research Guidelines Project

Using Qualitative Methods in Healthcare Research
A Comprehensive Guide for Designing, Writing, Reviewing and Reporting Qualitative Research


PURPOSE

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has sponsored the Qualitative Research Guidelines Project to develop a website that will be useful for people developing, evaluating and engaging in qualitative research projects in healthcare settings. 

The goals of this project are to:

  • Identify and describe a wide range of qualitative research methods, interpretive and analytic approaches commonly used in healthcare research
  • Identify published criteria for designing high quality qualitative research projects that reflect the values of the healthcare community. Click here to see the published criteria we identified.
  • Provide links to publications that exemplify excellence in qualitative research.            Click here to see the exemplars we have identified.
  • Address issues around the integration of qualitative and quantitative research approaches in multi-method studies

 

NORR | Web Links | Nursing Research /Theory

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has sponsored the Qualitative Research Guidelines Project to develop a website that will be useful for people developing, evaluating and engaging in qualitative research projects in healthcare settings.

Qualitative research in healthcare refers broadly to methods used to collect and analyze textual or image-based data in order to make sense of behavioral and practice issues in the clinical setting. We can also use qualitative research to make sense of program evaluation responses.

There are some important differences between qualitative and quantitative research. Instead of using statistical techniques to analyze numerical data, qualitative analysis uses structured, interpretive steps to analyze text or images. In addition, qualitative research doesn’t usually test a hypothesis or lead to generalizations, but instead focuses on the complexity of meanings that participants bring to their experience of clinical practice and to the context in which practice occurs. You can also use qualitative methods to generate a hypothesis that could subsequently be tested by a quantitative method, such as a survey.

FAQ 2: I have mountains of responses to open-ended questions from program evaluations that I think are full of valuable insight, but I don’t know what to do with all this text.