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Zulus on the Ramparts! The Battle of Rorke's Drift - Solitaire War Boxed Board Game

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Battle of Isandlwana - The Full Wiki

The British government's reasoning for a new invasion was threefold. The first was to a degree and national honour demanded that the enemy, victors in one battle, should lose the war. The second concerned the domestic political implications with ramifications at the next parliamentary elections. However, despite the new invasion the British and his party would lose the . Finally, there were considerations affecting the Empire: unless the British were seen to win a clear-cut victory against the Zulus, it would send a signal that the was vulnerable and that the defeat of a British field army could alter policy. Until then, one of the arguments against a war with the Zulus was that the costs could not be justified.[citation needed] If the Zulu victory at Isandlwana encouraged resistance elsewhere in the Empire, then committing the resources necessary to defeat the Zulus would in the long term prove cheaper than fighting wars the Zulu success inspired against British elsewhere.

Rorke's Drift: After the Zulu victory at Isandlwana on the afternoon of January 22, 4,000 Zulu warriors attacked 150-155 British troops and volunteers that night at the Rorke's Drift outpost. The vastly outnumbered British force held off multiple attacks and the Zulus withdrew on January 23rd

Zulu War, 1879 | Online Exhibitions - National Army Museum

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The British government's reasoning for a new invasion was threefold. The first was to a degree and national honour demanded that the enemy, victors in one battle, should lose the war. The second concerned the domestic political implications at the next parliamentary elections. However, despite the new invasion, the and his party would lose the 1880 election. Finally, there were considerations affecting the Empire: unless the British were seen to win a clear-cut victory against the Zulus, it would send a signal that the was vulnerable and that the defeat of a British field army could alter policy. If the Zulu victory at Isandlwana encouraged resistance elsewhere in the Empire, then committing the resources necessary to defeat the Zulus would, in the long term, prove cheaper than fighting wars that the Zulu success inspired against British Imperialism elsewhere.

The British government's reasoning for a new invasion was threefold. The first was to a degree and national honour demanded that the enemy, victors in one battle, should lose the war. The second concerned the domestic political implications at the next parliamentary elections. However, despite the new invasion, the and his party would lose the 1880 election. Finally, there were considerations affecting the Empire: unless the British were seen to win a clear-cut victory against the Zulus, it would send a signal that the was vulnerable and that the defeat of a British field army could alter policy. If the Zulu victory at Isandlwana encouraged resistance elsewhere in the Empire, then committing the resources necessary to defeat the Zulus would, in the long term, prove cheaper than fighting wars that the Zulu success inspired against British Imperialism elsewhere.